No, Anime News Network, Rising of the Shield Hero’s Premise Isn’t Misogynistic

After casually running an advert for a dangerous far-right Japanese cult, Anime News Network has returned to the realm of controversy with their preview guide for Rising of the Shield Hero, an adaptation of Yusagi Aneko’s isekai light novel. The story follows ‘somewhat otaku’ Naofumi as he’s thrust into a video game-like world that’s on the brink of annihilation, unless he and three other heroes become strong enough to fend off the apocalyptic perils that have been prophesied. Naofumi thinks he’s a hot shot, but his reputation soon crumbles to ruin as he finds himself the recipient of a false accusation of sexual assault.

Before the show had begun to air, ANN’s Editorial Director Zac Bertschy exclaimed on Twitter that the premise of a false rape claim should be ‘toned down’, and that it signified that the story was for ‘viscous, regressive misogynists’. He misrepresented the story as being about ‘getting revenge’ on Myne, the woman who accuses Naofumi, and went on to condemn Crunchyroll for their involvement in such a problematic show.

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Bertschy’s rants were warning shots: ANN’s Nick Creamer (or ‘Bobduh’) who also blogs at Wrong Every Time, livetweeted some of his disdainful thoughts on the double-length first episode. Towards the end of his experience, he exclaimed that “whole plot is based on a false rape accusation that everyone immediately believes, something that virtually never happens in real life, and which is only an epidemic in the minds of paranoid misogynists”. In his ANN review of the episode, Creamer asserts that it’s ‘tone deaf’ to establish a story upon a false rape accusation, because ‘vastly’ more rapes are going unreported and the oppression of female victims makes it incredibly hard for them to speak up about their experiences. Theron Martin agrees with his own vague words: “given what’s been going on in the world lately, the timing of this premise probably couldn’t have been worse”.

ANN readers are supposed to simply accept that basing a story on a false rape claim is taboo, and that anyone who sympathizes with the protagonist victimized by the accusation is a misogynist who believes that the accuser is a stand-in for all women. Clearly, the only progressive thing to do is condemn the show for daring to suggest a woman could abuse a justice system that gives the accused no due process.

If we want to discuss how ‘problematic’ it is to build a story upon a premise like this, our first recourse should be in the facts.

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While it is difficult to gain an exact figure for the number of rape reports in any country that have been ‘fake’, in his Encyclopedia of Violence, Margaret DiCanio explains that estimates are generally placed at the 2-10% range, and we see this supported by numerous studies over the last couple of decades. This is not a trivial figure. This is not ‘virtually never’. If Creamer believes victims of false rape accusation to be a ‘statistical aberration’, what must he think of the victims of more specific kinds of hate crime? The FBI’s 2018 annual report shows that hate crimes towards trans and gender-nonconforming people only occupied 1% of the 1249 bias incidents reported. Are we supposed to treat those crimes as less important because they’re a minority in comparison to crimes targeted at other groups? Would a story based around transphobic violence be considered ‘tone deaf’ because it diverts attention away from hate crimes against gay men, which occupied nearly 60% of 2018’s bias incidents?

Perspective matters: we should be supporting those affected by hate crimes no matter how much of a majority or minority they are. The same should go for those involved in accusations of rape. Rapists should never go unpunished. False claimants should never go unpunished.

Unfortunately, false claimants can sometimes do a lot worse than simply escape without consequence.

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If ‘context’ is so important to Creamer, shouldn’t he be aware that Japan’s conviction rate is over 99%? Granted, this figure is greatly affected by around 95% of sexual assault cases going unreported, but this does not undermine the fact that an accusation constructed with enough evidence can turn a man’s life upside down. The acclaimed Japanese film ‘Sore de mo boku wa yattenai’ (I Just Didn’t Do It) takes a real-life example of this: the protagonist is falsely charged for groping on a train, and he is detained and eventually convicted of the crime. At the end of the film he appeals: in real life, the ‘hero’ only won his freedom after a five year legal battle. In the last few years there’s been a boom in interest in insurance against false claims of groping on public transport, so the film’s example is hardly an isolated case. With rape much more under-reported in Japan than the West, it is certainly a blessing for victims to have a system that almost always guarantees punishment for offenders that they manage to get prosecuted. But believing this system isn’t at all open to abuse isn’t progressive – it’s blind naivety.

In the context of Japanese society, Shield Hero’s premise is understandable: how could it not be a concern for men that their lives could be ruined by a woman abusing the justice system, or dragging their name down in public? Foregrounding this in a story doesn’t signify an author’s hatred of women, or a belief that they generally have a desire to lie and have the police ruin men’s lives. The hatred is directed towards the system itself, of which women who falsely accuse are as important as the corrupt court of law. The summoning of the heroes is entirely non-consensual, and the corruption of Shield Hero’s world is emphasized frequently throughout the episode: if Merlomarc is a matriarchy, why is the queen’s seat in the throne room empty?

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This correlates to the thoughts of Yusagi on what it’s like living in the 21st century:

It is preferable to have morals, but we’ve made a world were the strictly ethical can no longer survive. There are a lot of people out there that simply don’t respond to ethics–in the face of people like that, what option is left besides emotionally insisting on your place and your views?

Yusagi’s premise isn’t about men going up against women: it’s about those with good ethics going up against an unfair system, and being unable to look ethical in the process. Our protagonist is forced to play the ‘loser’ class, and he contradicts what the legend says about him, so everyone looks down at him from the get-go. The accuser is the first girl he meets, the girl who’s typically ‘The One’ in isekai stories. He makes the right decision by not drinking with her – many other pervy isekai heroes would have jumped at the opportunity – but his reputation is destroyed rather than strengthened. In the audience’s eyes he knew his boundaries and didn’t get carried away, but Merlomarc must see him as filth.

Naofumi is also quick to blame Motoyasu as well as Myne, so the notion of this plot point being about women specifically and an ‘epidemic’ of false accusers is absolutely bunk: “these people are all dirty, disgusting filth”, Naofumi says. He hates the world, not simply the girl who accused him, and his ‘punishment’ is that the world will hate him: that’s the paradigm that the rape accusation establishes. So when the trader tries to mess with him, he messes with the trader back. As Yusagi says in the above interview, in the face of enemies who don’t respect ethics, “we often have no choice but to launch a counterattack”.

In addition to disregarding the context of Japanese culture for Shield Hero, Creamer seems to have no interest in the story being told in front of him. He ignores clear and reasonable explanations in favour of one that will allow him to dunk on the awful ‘misogynists’ he’s run into online, and the author who apparently ranks among them.

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It’s not like we’re flooded with anime predicated on false accusations of rape: isekai stories vary greatly in how their worlds are developed and how their heroes navigate them. Shield Hero’s starting point is a rarity, which explains why Creamer cannot correlate it to any other works of its genre – he only makes a comparison to ‘several paranoid conspiratorial memes about feminists I’ve seen online’ in his review. He gives precedence to what misogynistic trolls say about women online (only in the English-speaking sphere, of course) over the culture of the actual country of origin for the media’ he’s discussing, and that says a lot about how much he cares about ‘context’. His polemic also reeks of the same rejection of support for male victims that saw Earl Silverman’s shelter for male abused victims forced to shut down, leading to Silverman’s suicide.

In the West, mainstream media outlets have often preferred to emphasize the rarity of false rape accusations, rather than offer closer insights into the effect that these rare occurrences have had on their victims.  In 2015, a seventeen year old boy committed suicide after being falsely accused of rape: his mother also killed herself a year after his death, because she couldn’t imagine a future without him. Many publications refused to acknowledge that the claim had been false: a note beneath The Telegraph’s article explains that “an earlier version of this report wrongly described the rape allegation made against Jay Cheshire as ‘false’. In fact it was simply withdrawn. We apologise for the error”. The BBC and The Guardian have a troubling history of ignoring cases of suicide after false rape accusations outright. These people must feel like even more of a ‘statistical aberration’ when media outlets refuse to give them full and fair coverage.

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We should always keep everything in perspective: none of these issues are as pertinent as the under-reporting of rape and the oppression of victims into silence. But a terrible precedent is set when we turn a blind eye to those who are harmed by the system being abused. Building a story upon a false rape accusation isn’t ‘tone deaf’ and shouldn’t even be seen as controversial: such accusations may happen rarely, but the stories of those affected are still worth telling. Rape victims need more support than victims of false accusation, but that doesn’t mean the latter group can be ignored entirely.

Will Shield Hero build upon its premise in a productive way? Having not read any of the source material, I have no idea. If it handles the subject poorly, let’s criticize it for that, and not for the premise itself, unless we want to encourage a harmful taboo that further damages the ability for male victims to speak out. With a new year of anime only just beginning, let’s save the screeches of ‘controversy’ for something actually problematic.

The article has been edited to provide additional information/clarity/citations/etc.

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42 Comments

  1. Some possible SPOILERS here if anyone cares. I’ve read a lot of the source material. You’ve been warned.

    There’s a lot about Naofumi’s situation that isn’t explained for a long while, but reasonably so. He shut down for something like a couple weeks before even going out to I’ll balloons. In that time he blocked out pretty much anything anyone told him. His hatred of the world also stopped him from caring about learning about it for even longer.

    In Melromarc, the national religion is the Church of the THREE Heroes. They consider the Shield Hero evil and refer to him as the Shield Demon. This belief is held strongly by the king and his eldest daughter, but thankfully not by the queen (who is unfortunately away for diplomatic reasons) and the younger princess. This colors everyone’s perception of the Shield Hero in the country in a negative light.

    The reason the religion excludes the Shield and the people hate him is rooted in a deep set racism that the humans of Melromarc have against demi-humans as a bordering demi-human country is a long standing enemy who they share a bloody history with. This demi-human country was founded by the Shield Hero of an ancient era who was friendly with and favored the demi-humans, so they see the Shield as their God rather than the other three.

    From here I’m sure anyone reading can connect the last 2 dots in this vicious loop, which I hope gives everyone a little more in-verse context to the situation as well. I don’t remember which novels this information comes from, and I believe it’s spread out over a coulple, but if I were to hazard a guess I’d put it being volume 4 or later.

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    1. If I remember correctly…***spoiler***

      The king purposefully jumped the gun in summoning the heroes in order to summon them while the Queen was out. And I’m not sure on this front.. But I think the countries were supposed to summon the heroes together.

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      1. The countries as a whole were supposed to make an agreement about summoning the heroes, and not only that but each hero was supposed to be summoned in a different country as well rather than all being in one. By all rights Naofumi should have been summoned to the demi-human nation instead of Melromarc, but as you said the king jumped the gun despite not actually having that authority.

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    2. I just started reading the LNs (just finished the first one) so far really enjoying it and with how you e explained it In looking forward to it even more now

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  2. Spoilers, she’s a fragment of a genocidal “Goddess” who destroys worlds on a whim, so it’s not surprising ANN would White Knight for a monster like her.

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    1. It would have been really cool of you to format your comment in a way that makes it easier to not be spoiled.

      It’s almost impossible to not read bits of it as you glance through the comments section and tacking “spoilers” onto the front of your comment isn’t really going to help much in the way of stopping people from being spoiled.

      Also stating whether its manga spoilers or LN spoilers would be cool too.

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  3. I think they shouldn’t tone it down at all leave it how it is. It shows sheild heros fall and gives way for him to rise up and prove he is more than just the rumors (also ties with title) the false accusations against him also gives him his strongest and most dangerous sheild fueled by hus hatred for the world.
    The story isnt misogynistic just cause it has a women abuseing her title and place in the royal family.
    What would it be better if the main character was a trans drag muslim jew gender fluid disabled furry and the princess(Bitch-san) a straight white man.(Dont even think about it that will ruin the anime.) It doesnt need to change if u have a problem with it dont watch it nobody is forcing u to.
    I have high expectations for this anime i love the manga
    Dont fuck it up please
    Do it justice. Do it right.
    Follow the manga

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  4. Thanks, I didn’t much like his review of it either felt that they had judge it entirely on just a few facts instead of the grand picture.

    This is not Goblin Slayer where you have Goblins who commits acts of evil for no other reason than there own benefit. Instead this series has humans who do this for no other reason then to benefit themselves.

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  5. The Rise of the Shield Hero is based on the premise of debunking the common theme of summoned heroes being held in glory. Shieldbro explores avenues that fight the isekai premise. Translation notes for the end of the novel even state where the story has an extended ending to satisfy the fan base. This is merely the first episode of the anime but people seem to forego the notion of SOURCE MATERIAL. ANY sort of fact-checking would indicate that more is going on in the world that can’t be covered in the first episode, even if it IS a double-length feature

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  6. They should probably read the manga and see how it ACTUALLY plays out. This type of short sighted reporting just hurts shows that are highly anticipated and already have a large fanbase.

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  7. ANN is retarded they are a bunch of idiots who hardly ever look into the shows and obviously dont do any research instead just push their agenda even in the US a false rape charge can destroy your life and family friend of ours was accused falsely of sexual assault not rape but even after he was cleared he struggled to find a job for almost 3 years and felt like society hated him once allegations come forth many quickly make their own opinions on the matter even disregarding the kingdoms religion if their ultimate authority the king said he was guilty of raping his daughter many in the kingdom would quickly jump to the conclusion he must have done it and in any scenario the mc is lucky he was immediately targeted by evryone in the kingdom and attacked and instead recieved scorn

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  8. “false accusations about rape is not possible in real life”? Are you even trying to look? So what you mean is male will always do the dirty work while the females are all good ones? Search this “Vhong Navarro rape accusation” and try to say that can’t happen in real life. Don’t even forget about the Adam and Eve story and WHO commit the first sin.(not trying to offend females just trying to protect the plot of the anime and nothing more)(crimes can easily be put on everyone because of power)

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  9. This is a very good article, Jeko, and I’m glad to have read it. I wasn’t previously aware of Sore de mo boku wa yattenai, the 2018 FBI report nor the tragedies and disservices associated with false rape allegations, and viewing Shield Hero as an analogy for the Japanese justice system, or the world in general, is an interesting perspective. I’m happy that the important message that you wrote about here is getting so much attention.
    However, I think that improvements could be made to both your citations and the grammar/clarity of certain sentences. I’ll make separate responses for the criticisms on the citations, and the criticisms on the writing.

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    1. “While it is difficult to gain an exact figure for the number of rape reports in any country that have been ‘fake’, in his Encyclopedia of Violence, M. DiCanio explains that estimates are generally placed at the 2-10% range.”
      Since this is the first time that this book has been mentioned in the article, shouldn’t the title (The Encyclopedia of Violence: Origins, Attitudes, Consequences) be written out in full? Additionally, unlike the online sources, whose publication information can be found by clicking on the provided hyperlinks, no hyperlink is provided for this book. The information on its publication isn’t even cited, and it’s important to know from what page or pages DiCanio’s estimate was referenced from. Not to mention that the book was published in 1993 (https://www.amazon.com/Encyclopedia-Violence-Origins-Attitudes-Consequences/dp/0816023328/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1546991493&sr=1-1&keywords=The+Encyclopedia+of+Violence%3A+Origins%2C+Attitudes%2C+Consequences), so the estimate may be different today. Granted, your point that false rape allegations are not something that ‘virtually never’ happens still stands, as their frequency is most definitely not zero today, but I do believe that it’s weakened by the lack of a proper citation.
      “The FBI’s 2018 annual report shows that hate crimes towards trans people only occupied 1% of the 1279 bias incidents reported.”
      According to the FBI report, “…1,470 victims were involved in 1,249 separate bias incidents.” You wrote 1279 instead of 1249.
      Additionally, the report said that 1 percent of the 1249 bias incidents “targeted transgender and gender-nonconforming people,” whereas you stated that the 1 percent only applied to trans people. Granted, the accompanying graph in that report contradicts the written statistics, as the bar for reported anti-transgender hate crimes alone is greater than that for reported anti-bisexual hate crimes despite the reported hate crimes against bisexuals being 2 percent. It’s not a completely reliable statistic.
      “…because it diverts attention away from homophobic crimes, which occupied nearly 60% of 2018’s bias incidents?”
      The report said that “nearly 60 percent of these incidents targeted gay men.” Homophobic crimes does include crimes against gay men, but when I first read that in your article, I thought that “homophobic crimes” included those against both gay men and lesbians.
      “If ‘context’ is so important to Creamer, shouldn’t he be aware that Japan’s conviction rate is over 99%[1]?”
      “With rape much more under-reported in Japan than the West…”
      What are the sources for both the >99% conviction rate in Japan, and the comparison of the frequency of rape reports between Japan and the Western countries? If Sore de mo boku wa yattenai was supposed to be the source for the comparison, then that wasn’t evident through the writing.
      “…he only makes a comparison to ‘several paranoid conspiratorial memes about feminists I’ve seen online’.”
      Since you provided two sources related to Creamer, it isn’t clear that this quote originated from his Shield Hero review on ANN.
      “In 2015, a seventeen year old boy committed suicide after being falsely accused of rape: his mother also killed herself a year after his death, because she ‘couldn’t imagine a future without him’.”
      Even though you didn’t use quotation marks to mark ‘couldn’t imagine a future without him’ as a quote, it still comes across as one. Because of that, it’s perplexing that this quote, and the fact that the mother committed suicide one year after his death, aren’t cited.
      “[1] It’s important to note that this figure is partly caused by an estimate of 95% of sexual assault cases going unreported. The Japanese legal system is far, far worse for women than it is for men, and far worse for rape victims than it is for victims of false accusations.”
      What are the sources for these two sentences?

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      1. “…and that anyone who sympathizes with the protagonist victimized by the accusation is a misogynist who believes that the accuser is a stand-in for all women.”
        I feel that that sentence was becoming a run-on sentence, and you had established that the protagonist had been victimized by a false rape allegation four times beforehand. One of those times was in that very same sentence, so I think it can be safe to assume that the reader understands that the protagonist is a victim. With that in mind, I think that “protagonist victimized by the accusation” could be made more concise by shortening it into ‘victimized protagonist’ or even just ‘protagonist.’
        “…in his Encyclopedia of Violence, M. DiCanio…”
        You wrote the full name of each real-life person when they were first mentioned, but you didn’t do so for Margaret DiCanio.
        “The acclaimed Japanese film ‘Sore de mo boku wa yattenai’ (I Just Didn’t Do It) takes a real-life example of this occurring…”
        I think that the syntax could be improved, maybe like this: ‘The acclaimed Japanese film ‘Sore de mo boku wa yattenai’ (I Just Didn’t Do It) portrays a true story on this kind of occurrence…’
        “Foregrounding this in a story doesn’t signify an author’s hatred of women, or a belief that they generally have a desire to lie and have the police ruin men’s lives.”
        I got confused as to whether the desire was possessed by the author or the women. I think that replacing ‘they’ with ‘women’ would make the sentence more understandable.
        “The hatred is directed towards the system itself, within which women who falsely accuse are as much of a part as the court of law the innocent victim would have to testify against.”
        I think that this sentence doesn’t flow well, but I don’t see an easy solution to this problem. What I would recommend, though, is to change ‘are as much of a part as the court of law the innocent victim’ to ‘are as much a part of the court of law that the innocent victim.’
        “The summoning of the heroes is entirely non-consensual, and the corruption of Shield Hero’s world is emphasized frequently throughout the episode: if Merlomarc is a matriarchy, why is the queen’s seat in the throne room empty?”
        The paragraph that this sentence belongs to was about how the justice system could be abused, but then the theme of the paragraph suddenly expands to the flaws of the fantasy world. I think that including something like ‘the world of Shield Hero is also quite flawed, as…’ at the beginning of the quoted sentence would be a good transition.
        Additionally, since there’s a conditional sentence here, there should be an ‘if’ before “why is the queen’s seat in the throne room empty?” However, perhaps conditional sentences are structured differently in the UK.
        “This correlates to the thoughts of Yusagi himself on what it’s like living in the 21st century…”
        I think that ‘on what it’s like to live in the 21st century’ would flow better.
        “He makes the right decision by not drink with her…”
        I think that the grammar could be improved here by writing ‘He makes the right decision to not drink with her…’
        “…many other pervy isekai heroes would have jumped at the opportunity…”
        Since this is a generalization of sorts, I think that including an example of a pervy isekai hero, such as Kazuma from Konosuba, would strengthen your argument that Naofumi had a good heart when he declined to drink with Myne.
        “…but his reputation is destroyed rather than strengthened.”
        Why should Naofumi’s reputation be strengthened because of his declination to drink? One assumption could be that drinking with a woman who was exhibiting seductive behaviour would lead to perverted or exploitative behaviour. Another assumption was that he didn’t discard his moral code by drinking while underage, especially since this fantasy world probably didn’t have that kind of law and he could do whatever he wanted as a summoned hero. As may be evident, it’s not clear as to why his reputation should have been strengthened based on what you wrote alone.
        “Naofumi is also quick to blame Motoyasu as well as Myne…”
        You use Motoyasu to lead into Naofumi’s hatred of the world, but writing that Naofumi condemned the royalty and the other heroes for their bigoted judgements would have sufficed. So why Motoyasu in particular? Including Naofumi’s belief that this ‘ally’ was a co-conspirator with Myne would justify the inclusion of Motoyasu here.
        “It’s not like we’re flooded with anime predicated on false accusations of rape: isekai stories vary greatly in how their worlds are developed and how their heroes navigate them. Shield Hero’s starting point is a rarity, which explains why Creamer cannot correlate it to any other works of its genre – he only makes a comparison to ‘several paranoid conspiratorial memes about feminists I’ve seen online’.”
        The paragraph preceding the above quotes is about Creamer’s disregard for the story of Shield Hero, so I was disoriented when the next paragraph starts with the quotes. Even though this paragraph is, again, about Creamer, the opening sentence doesn’t include him at all, so it’s a slight misdirection. I feel that “It’s not like we’re flooded with anime predicated on false accusations of rape” shares the same idea as “Shield Hero’s starting point is a rarity,” and can thus be replaced by the latter clause. I also feel that “isekai stories vary greatly in how their worlds are developed and how their heroes navigate them” is a truism present in all stories, regardless of genre, and that it doesn’t contribute to the fact that anime premises built on false accusations of rape are rare. I think a better introductory sentence would be ‘Shield Hero’s starting point is a rarity, both in isekai stories and anime as a whole, which explains…’
        “…over the culture of the actual country of origin for the media’ he’s discussing…”
        Why is there an apostrophe after ‘media’?
        “His polemic also reeks of the same rejection of support for male victims that saw Earl Silverman’s shelter for male abused victims forced to shut down, leading to Silverman’s suicide.”
        I think that the syntax here could be improved by writing ‘that caused the shutdown of Earl Silverman’s shelter for male abused victims, leading to Silverman’s suicide.’
        “With a new year of anime only just beginning, let’s save the screeches of ‘controversy’ for something actually problematic.”
        I would write ‘for something that’s actually problematic’ but the original phrasing sounds fine too.
        Lastly, I apologize that I failed in threading my comments together like a Twitter thread. I pressed ‘reply’ before pasting my thoughts, but that didn’t seem to work.

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        1. Hey Astralius! Really appreciate the detailed critique.

          Being burned out from academia has certainly made me go a bit lax on making sure I link to/cite the source of everything.

          Regarding the 2-10% statistic, I couldn’t find any later studies that places that range into dispute. I’ve added a link to this study (https://web.archive.org/web/20180101025446/https://icdv.idaho.gov/conference/handouts/False-Allegations.pdf) that covers a lot of other studies across the past couple decades.

          The source for the 95% figure is in Japanese, but I’ve added it now as well.

          I’ve rewritten the paragraph regarding the 99% conviction, as it definitely needed more sources. I’d neglected to add a piece more directly relevant to train gropings, which are more directly relevant to the film being discussed.

          I’ve made a few adjustments to phrasing it places, though I don’t agree with all your suggests: it may come down to preference of voice. But thank you very much again for all of them.

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          1. You’re very welcome! I’m glad that some of my feedback was useful to you. I also read through your article just now, and I think that it’s a good deal better now. That study on false allegations of sexual assault looks interesting too; I bookmarked that for a future read.

            There’s one more thing that I wanted to comment on, if I may. You wrote Margret DiCanio as the author of Encyclopedia of Violence. I did a quick google search on both that name and the book’s title, but that name didn’t appear. Is that a typo, or was I just not thorough enough in my search?

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  10. I seriously want to laugh at the shallow reviews which allege this series to be about a false rape charge and revenge. I’ve read most of the source material and I can say that the whole rape thing is a minor issue and the light novel was weitten way before all this metoo movement things

    Jumping the gun like this is as bad as reading the title of a news article, the first chapter of a book or such and claiming to have read the whole book and passing judgement upon it.

    1) Why can’t a woman be in a antagonist role? Why can’t they lie and steal and trick the protagonist? What’s wrong with having an antagonist like that?

    2) Whats wrong with a hero in a quest for justice? Isn’t this what most stories are about?

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  11. Some spoilers below…
    False accusations are a lot more common than people think. Just like in the reverse situation (actual sexual assaults and/or rape), people who are falsely threatened often stay silent, and when publically accused, it’s turned into a witch hunt. I’ve seen it happen to people, and even if they are exonorated, it still marks their lives. This (people who falsely accused bothers) hurts those whom are actually assaulted, and I don’t think it should be “toned down” in the anime. The events that led to the shield hero’s downfall was such an event that it built distrust for him across the country, and watching him fall deeper, then climb up from that hole to redeem himself (with the help of his friends) was a part of what makes this great, builds empathy for the odd hero, and makes him relatable. The effects of her choice to falsely accuse him runs deep through the heroes later in the show (I won’t spoil it for anyone…).
    Why should a network (speaking of Crunchyroll) be looked down upon for aiding to address and show viewers such a modern day issue? Anime has helped many people overcome difficult times in their lives, and perhaps someone going through something similar might find courage to keep going thanks to this show. Nowadays, it seemed like anything that shows a woman as a villain and a male as the victim is looked down upon. If it were the other way around, this show would probably be getting praise instead of criticism. There’s potential for good and evil inside of everyone, regardless of their gender. I’m glad the author was able to give us the anime. The books are amazing, and it’s a great story of redemption and human error.

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  12. Why bro its not like that. This happens bro and its frwakin fantasy not saying anything about women in general why people gotta be like that soon any plot with a bad female character and male protagonist is mysoginistoc.

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  13. ANN are a bunch of left social warriors and sorosian kind of feminist (women are perfect and man should be condamned), really there is people who is surprised about this? They hate anime and japanese otaku subculture, they do it just for clickbait and adv money, is just a work around this, they aren’t fans at all or care about creating controversies.

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  14. Excellent analysis! ANN is way biased, pushing their political agenda. Anime fans dont like it, you can even check the giant backlash at the comments in the same article they made!!!!

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  15. This is so true. Especially with what happened with Kavanaugh earlier. It’s extremely unjust, a form of power-grab by the radical feminists to destabilize society to further their own agenda. It’s sad to see that a lot of people fell to it and support those false-accusers. Kudos to the writer for this article

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  16. Solid article but just wanted to make two clarifications.
    1st) The fact that Japan has a 99% conviction rate is not really a good thing and I implore you and anybody do some research into this.
    2nd) The 2-10% percent figure is for rape cases that we can say for certain are false not the actual number, the real number could be much higher.

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    1. Yes, the 99% rate is a sign of how few cases are actually prosecuted, which is a bad thing for victims. But it’s also a bad thing for anyone who gets falsely prosecuted, which does happen, even if it’s very very rare (much rarer than in the West, we could say).

      And yes, we can’t know the exact figure for false rape accusations, but studies over the last couple of decades have supported a 2-10% range.

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  17. >If ‘context’ is so important to Creamer, shouldn’t he be aware that Japan’s conviction rate is over 99%?

    Should you be aware that in Japan getting molested on the train is literally normal? This tells you a lot about their “sexual harassment” culture. Women literally tried to petition for single-sex wagons because they had no way to stop it.

    If you think Japan is a country in which women can just cry “rape” and get the accused arrested and jailed, you need a several reality check.

    >“isekai stories vary greatly in how their worlds are developed and how their heroes navigate them”
    lmao, no they don’t. It’s one of the most stale and stable genre which is way it gets mocked everywhere.

    >Foregrounding this in a story doesn’t signify an author’s hatred of women,
    It’s an Isekai. The intere genre basically exists to challelnge’s the writer and the audience issues with women. They don’t hate women as much they are mad women are not fucking them and they are fucking other people, hence why 90% of other male characters are evil, stupid or comic reliefs.

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    1. > If you think Japan is a country in which women can just cry “rape” and get the accused arrested and jailed, you need a several reality check.

      Great, because I don’t think that, and nothing in the article says that.

      Being told to get several reality checks is a new one though. Unless you meant ‘severe’.

      > lmao, no they don’t. It’s one of the most stale and stable genre which is way it gets mocked everywhere

      You don’t watch or read enough isekai then. And no, only an elitist vocal minority ‘mock’ the genre. Isekai anime wouldn’t be produced so often if there wasn’t a huge audience for them both in Japan and internationally.

      > It’s an Isekai. The intere genre basically exists to challelnge’s the writer and the audience issues with women. They don’t hate women as much they are mad women are not fucking them

      This isn’t worth responding to.

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  18. I know the false rape accusation premise is way overblown by “SJWs.” But from what I’ve read myself, later on the MC gets to own a lot of women slaves, and that certainly seems a bit misogynistic to me.

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    1. Basically he has only one slave, that he doesn’t treat as a slave.

      Later some other girl is mistreated and abandoned by another hero, and since she has a bad build, and he has a skill that make his slaves get better level ups, she becomes his “slave” and reset her level so she could train, after that she by agreement leaves and try to join the hero who mistreated and abandoned her.

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  19. The belief that Shield Hero is somehow an “alt-right neonazi misogynerd” show is typical BAIZUO claptrap. It’s very obvious that the show is criticizing the legal system from a Japanese point of view and how overzealous prosecution can be counter productive. But in typical western arrogance the white left assumes it’s all about them and judges a statement on Japanese culture as if it was somehow meant to be a statement on western political correctness. Fucking pathetic.

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